Англия

Общие испытательные клейма
Лондона и Бирмингема

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This number denotes the limits of the bore or gauge size of the weapon (all the examples shown here are of nominal 12 bore/gauge). From 1887 until 1954 fractional sizes were also available as set out in the list of proof sizes attached to this schedule. From 1954 until 1984 the appropriate imperial measurement size was stamped. Between 1984 and 1989 either the imperial measurement size or the metric size were optional alternatives. From 1989 onwards the metric size only was applied. It should be noted that in the case of a 12 bore/gauge gun the .729 classification was amended in 1986 to .728.
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[url]http://www.gunproofmarks.ru/[/url] In response to the introduction of choke boring, this marking was introduced in 1875 and used only until 1887. It was intended to signify the respective measurements of the barrel at both the breech and muzzle and indicated that the weapon was unsuitable for use with the ball ammunition available at that time. The two numbers are naturally varied with the respective bore sizes and the degree of choke. It should be remembered that if the barrel being proved did not contain any effective degree of choke boring, these marks were not applied.
[url]http://www.gunproofmarks.ru/[/url] This mark, the successor to the previous one, was introduced in 1887 to signify that the barrel contained some degree of choking. It was retained until 1954, when it was considered no longer necessary to specifically mark this detail. Where the mark is prefixed with the letter 'R', it signifies that the choke portion of the barrel was additionally rifled.
[url]http://www.gunproofmarks.ru/[/url] This diamond mark contains the nominal bore or gauge size for which the weapon is chambered and was introduced in 1887 at the same time as the fractional sizes to eliminate confusion. It indicated the actual size of ammunition for which the chamber was bored and, if the letter 'L' was additionally prefixed to the 'C', it indicated that a long chamber for a heavier load was applicable. Subsequently, under the 1954 Rules, the letter was discontinued.
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[url]http://www.gunproofmarks.ru/[/url] The 1887 Rules of Proof were the first ones to take account of the new nitro powders then coming into use. At that stage there was no standardised nitro mark, so the barrel would be stamped with a mark indicating the powder and powder load for which it was suitable for normal use in service. The figures denoted the number of grains of powder for that purpose. This first mark was only used by itself until 1896. The mark, including the words 'Max'm' 'Grs' and 'Shot', was used between 1896 and 1904 when 'Max'm' and 'Shot' were dropped together with the charge/load weights. (The examples shown only refer to Schultze powder.) Similar optional proof for a nominated powder with its weight in grains and projectile with its weight in grains or ounces was available until 1989. Thereafter, it remained available but in grams only.
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In 1896 this mark for the first time introduced the words 'nitro' proof and was used in conjunction with the maximum service load of shot for which the barrel was proved. In the alternative, the individual nominated powder and powder load was applied together with the service shot load where the barrel was specifically proved with that powder on request. From 1904 to 1925 the word 'Max' and the words 'Shot' and 'Grs' were omitted from the stamping for nominated powder proof (as in 5. above) and the word 'Max' was omitted from the standard nitro marks. The word 'Shot' was retained until 1925. Between 1925 and 1954 just the maximum service shot load was marked followed by 'oz'.


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[url]http://www.gunproofmarks.ru/[/url] From 1887 where rifles were intended for use with a larger than normal powder load, for example Express Rifles, this mark would be applied after the calibre was marked. It was used until 1925. From 1904 onwards the weight in grains of the powder and bullet of the maximum service charge were added and also used for non-Express rifles.
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[url]http://www.gunproofmarks.ru/[/url] From 1904 until 1954 this mark was applied to rifled or part rifled barrels intended for use with both shot and ball.
[url]http://www.gunproofmarks.ru/[/url] From 1925, when it was introduced, until 1989 the chamber length was stamped in inches, but from 1955 onwards it could also optionally be in metric measurement. After 1989 virtually all proof measurements were marked in metric only.
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[url]http://www.gunproofmarks.ru/[/url] From 1984 to 1989, in cases where metric proof was used, the marks indicated a proof rather than a service pressure in kilograms per square centimetre. The first mark was used for standard and the second for magnum proof. The alternative imperial proof marks introduced in 1954 (the example is for 12 bore/gauge) still referred to service or special heavy load service pressure. Only Birmingham applied the additional per [url]http://www.gunproofmarks.ru/[/url]" mark to the service pressure and then only until 1984 when they ceased the practice.
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[url]http://www.gunproofmarks.ru/[/url] From 1989 onwards all proof was marked in the metric measurements or Bar and the marking of kilograms per square centimetre was dropped. These examples are for Standard and Special or Magnum Proof.
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